Charly Black's life is still the same

The dream of one day becoming rich and happy will continue says dancehall artiste Charly Black, but that doesn’t mean life is the same

The dream of one day becoming rich and happy will continue says dancehall artiste Charly Black, but that doesn’t mean life is the same since he had recorded the prophetic single Rich This Year.

The selector, turned deejay, has in recent times, been enjoying a lot of star treatment and has become a popular figure in dancehall music. This, and many other changes have made the humble Trelawny-based artiste proud.


charly-black

“I feel proud of myself to know that people around the world have appreciate the work I have put out,” he said.

The words “If mi nuh rich dis year, next year nah pass cause mi born as a husla”, from the single, which was released last October, played out as a defining statement by someone who has seen glimpses of glory.

However, he revealed to THE STAR that his wealth has only increased slightly, and again, made another bold declaration on his future fortunes. “No, it nuh come through yet, but mi give mi self until next October fi own at least one room fi myself,” he laughed.

“If mi did rich I wud already buy one a dem big house deh inna Trelawny or rent a room in Kingston. It’s a definite no, and mi nah hide it at all. When mi get rich you will see it … plus mi nah worry cause Bounty Killer and Beenie Man a come from far,” he added.

Charly Black, who grew up in Rio Bueno, Trelawny, and is a father of three (Alicia, Bryan, and Kevin), has also recorded in one year, a string of ‘money anthem’ songs, signalling his desire of a brighter and better future.

high hopes

The two most noticed songs are Money Dreamer and Nah Pay Mi Rent.

Blacks is yet to work with some of the more popular music producers such as Stephen ‘Di Genius’ McGregor, Don Corleon, and DASECA, but has high hopes of teaming up with them in the near future.

“Di producers whe mi work wid are from Coppershot, dem show lot of interest and time in me, big up to dem fi dat,” he said.

The deejay also said his breakthrough song Buddy Buddy, which had reasonable successes both locally and internationally, labelled him as a one-dimensional artiste, and as a result, he wanted to show a different side with his ‘money anthem’ songs.

“It (Buddy Buddy) brought me to a wider market. Di market right now is to be different cause mi money chunes a show a different side a mi now, it a show seh mi versatile in nuff ways.

“All these songs am singing is something I wanted to do all along but no one wanted to record me until Buddy Buddy,” he said.

The artiste, who began his musical journey as a selector on Bass Odyssey, has steadily made a name for himself on the dancehall scene, his witty and thoughtful lyrics of ghetto struggles have pushed him up the list of promising upcoming dancehall artistes.

A recent tour of the Bahamas (Abaco, Nassau and Freeport), “was a very good experience for me,” he said, while noting that he and his management team also went on a month-long campaign in the United States to promote his music.

“It has been very, very, very splendid for me. Di greatest gift is life but mi feel gud dat people can recognise mi fi a song. Nuff luv to Sean Paul cause im hear di song (Rich This Year) and push a lot of vibes behind it,” he said.

Source: JamaicaStar

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