Capleton (born Clifton George Bailey III,13 April 1967, Saint Mary, Jamaica) is a Jamaican reggae and dancehall artist. He is also referred to as King Shango, King David, The Fireman and The Prophet. His record label is called David House Productions.

It was Stewart Brown, owner of a Toronto-based sound called African Star, who gave the untested artist his first break, flying him to Canada for a stage show alongside giants like Ninjaman and Flourgon. The audience poured out their appreciation, and he never looked back. When Capleton first burst on the scene in the late 1980s, the dancehall was a very different place than it is today. Slackness and gun talk were the order of the day. This bright promising newcomer announced his arrival with a string of hit songs from “Bumbo Red” to “Number One on the Look Good Chart” and “Lotion Man.” Everything he touched hit the sound-good charts, and the youthful artist with the nimble vocabulary and hardcore voice quickly established himself as one of dancehall‚s most reliable hitmakers. But even he could not have predicted that eleven years later, at the start of the new millennium, he would be dancehall’s ruling voice.

There followed a relationship with Def Jam records, who released two Capleton albums, Prophecy and I-Testament, which featured memorable collaborations with rap stars like Method Man and Q-Tip. Both records were warmly accepted by the international audience, but as the millennium drew to a close, Capleton sensed that it was time to return to his core audience. He had work to do. “I have to be myself, right? And I only can be me,” he reasons. “So whichever way fi make me be me, I work with dat. Y’understand.”

Capleton is now at the height of his powers. 1999 and 2000 have brought a ceaseless string of sound system favorite and dancehall chart toppers like the anti-violence anthem “Jah Jah City” and “Good In Her Clothes,” a message of respect for the sisters who carry themselves like Empresses rather than. But even as he completes his mission of upliftment, Capleton has had many critics. One of his biggest hits, in fact, is addressed the naysayers in the press and the ivory towers of power. “Critics won’t leave I alone,” chats the Prophet. “They say they can’t take the fire weh me put pon Rome”

Many of Capleton’s songs “and most of his critics” make mention of this blazing fire. Capleton hopes to clear up the confusion once and for all. “Is not really a physical fire. Is really a spiritual fire, and a wordical fire, and a musical fire. You see the fire is all about a livity. But is people get it on the wrong term. People get confused.So when a man say ‘more fire’ him think that mean say you fi go light the cane field or go light the church.” Fire, Capleton explains, is a way of reminding one‚s brother that they are going astray. “That way a man know say him doing something wrong. That even give him the urge to know say Yo check up on yourself. What you’re doing is not right, or else him would not say ‘Fire fi dat,’ or ‘Burn dat’ or ‘More fire.’” “If we go check it back now,” he continues, “fire is for the purification of earth, anyhow you check it. This earth itself have to even emerge from the literal fire also, which is the volcanic activity, we a talk bout lava. The hottest element to rise us in the morning is the sun. The water cleanse, but it’s still the support from the fire that burn the water, burn out of the bacteria so the water coulda heal we fi cleanse. The herb heal, but it’s still the fire fi burn the herb so the herb coulda heal we also.”

On July 1st After 2 Years Capleton Returns to Toronto Canada for One Show Only at the Sound Academy Formally Known As “The Docks” 11 Polson Street Toronto, Ontario with a capacity of 4000 plus occupants over 13,240 square feet (1,230 m2) of floor space, the world’s largest and most expensive sound system and the Patio with Bar and sitting area can accommodate up to 1200 people and will provide you with a majestic and breath taking View of Toronto’s Fire Works As we celebrate Canada Day

 

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